The Flyfishers at The Crossing Page
Home
 Trips/Pictures
Our Page
Fly Tying Info
Flyfishing Links

This page was last updated: June 18, 2017
Hold your mouse pointer over any photo and see description - click on and see larger photo.
Kenny Klimes
2005
Terry Seaton
2005
John Bloss
2005
Mike Meadows
2007
John Walker
2007
Jim Brickler
2007
Jerry Lybarger
2007
Larry Farrar
2007
Roy Stueber
2007
Jason Stull
2007
Jeff Rabe
2007
Gordon Reiter
2008
Al Blair
2008
Tim Graham
2008
Kevin Jerome
2008
Mike Harvey
2008
Toby Simers
2008
Mark Smalley
2008
Don Seegers
2008
Fred Schwartztrauber
2009
Paul Chambers
2009
Miles Short
2009
Mike Chambers
2009
Jim Anzer
2009
Sam Alkhalaf
2009
Brent McClane
2009
Lew Smith 
2009
Dave Beerbower
2009
Mike Gay
2009
Dick Hollander
2009
Bruce Morton
2009
Bob Chott
2009
Archie McKinley
2010
John Guyer
2010
Bruce Sheffield
2011
Brett Heath
2011
Mike Bisaga
2011
Jeff Kline
2011
Keith Leibee
2011
Pete Drochelman
2011
Mike Walton
2011
Dave Komor
2011
Brandon Kostial
2011
Larry Smith
2011
Joe Walker
2011
Nathan Gross
2012
Chris Sattovia
2012
Brian Yost
2012
Wooly Bugger Fly Co.
Mark Johnson
2012
Tim McCoy
2012
Sid Aslin
2012
Scott Drooger
2012
Stan Rozanski
2012
Mike Mikulin
2012
Larry Linneman
2012
Bob Bowling
2012
Stan Patton
2012
Jim Franke
2012
Tom Kelly
2012
Jaime Correa
2012
Johan Gerber
2012
Bob Aslin
2013
Jake Welty
2013
Art McCluer
2013
Tim Trog
2013
Andrew Holderby
2013
Craig Dull
2013
Tom Bailey
2013
Jim Deckert
2013
Steve McDaniel
2013
Matt McClure
2013
Jim Minor
2013
Kevin Suttner
2014
Gary Elliott
2014
Tim Klotz
2014
Mike Cook
2014
John Palmer
2014
Dave Inman
2014
Darryl Weinrich
2014
Dennis Puryear
2014
James Edwards
2014
Jeff Layton
2014
Rory Pottgen
2014
Miles Meyers
2014
Jim Lillenberg
2014
Steve Kettering
2015
Charlie Prestian
2015
Ron Fiala
2015
Wayne Sebasty
2015
John Chi
2015
Jason Corman
2015
Andy Crannage
2015
Dave Franke
2015
Jordan Crist
2015
Connor Peters
2015
Steve Fleschner
2015
Rich Fleschner
2015
Thorne Spence
2015
Robert Tighe
2015
Joel Burke
2015
Mike Yahl
2016
Bill Byington
2016
Steve Clark
2016
Brian Smith
2016
Jon O'Connor
2016
Bennett Sieczkowski
2016
Al Angiocchi
2016
Ron Berger
2016
Butch Heath, Jared Pierce, Jonathan Pierce and Tyler Pierce
 2015
Virginia Brothers
Nick Skogen
2016
Denver Brother
Greg Krochta
2016
Denver Brother
Our Denver Fellowship Group
2016
Lee Armstrong
2016
Jim Craig
2016
Bill Lowry
2016
Martin Jones
2016
Bob Beckett
2016
Matt Thal
2016
Rick McMichael
2016
Adam Hayes
2016
Barry Dunnegan
2017
Jon Copeland
2017
Tom Love
2017
Jim Kladney
2017
Mike Oldani
2017
Jim Hynds
Honorary Member
Czechoslovakia
John Kozak
Honorary Member
Alaska
Eric Edwards
Honorary Member
Colorado
The Flyfishers at The Crossing Catch and Release Board
Kenny's Korner
In this new section we will answer your questions about fly fishing techniques, local hatches, tying techniques, future trips, why I'm bald, what flies to use - where and when,  my thoughts about this great sport and more. Have a question? Just email me by hitting the "email me" button above. 
email me
Here is a great article on everything you need to know about midges.  Please read it and you will have a better catch rate here in Missouri and elsewhere.  Click on this for Life Cycle of the Midge!
The Best Uni-thread furled leaders and more...... Click on the Logo to go to their web site.  A 20% discount on all furled leaders. Must use member discount code.
Best Fly Shop in St. Louis.  Provides the FATC a 10% discount on all in store items - must show membership card for discount.  Also they have put together three rod/reel/fly line combos for us - beginner, novice, and intermediate. Awesome prices!!  Ask us!!
Quality Discount Flies!!  Click on Logo to go to their web site.  A  15% - 20% discount, free shipping and fast service.  Must use member discount code. WB also makes our very own FATC Kits - contain only the flies that we use here in Missouri.  Starter Kit, Dry Fly Kit, Midge Kit, and Terrestrial Kit.  Owned by Jason Edwards a FATC member!
Special in store discounts for us at certain times of the year from 20 - 25%.  Watch for dates of discount days on our web site or via emails.
If you fly fish on Lake Taneycomo this is the ONLY fly shop to use for all your fishing needs.  Show your  FATC membership card and they will give you a small discount for their appreciation. Shannon or Carolyn are usually working the shop.  
Contact Us
Mystery of the Tattooed Browns Solved

In the past weeks several of our FATC flyfishers have fished the Meramec river just outside the park where browns had been stocked earlier in the month. They were told to watch for the Tattooed Browns by one of the Conservation officers in the park. Tattooed Browns? Now what was that all about? Why and how? So the investigation began. Browns were caught by our guys and sure enough they had the Tattoos, red markings, just behind the right eye (see pictures above). The FATC went to "our guy" in the Missouri Department of Conservation, Mark VanPatten, to get the answer. It was even a mystery to Mark at first but the answer was discovered. Read below the most interesting response to our question about the Tattooed Browns of the Meramec!!

Kenny see the reply I received from Wes Swee the Hatchery Manager at Meramec.

  We marked these fish a little differently this year. The brown trout we stock in the Meramec river are usually marked with a fin clip from Shepherd of the Hills hatchery. The fin clip is rotated from adipose, left pelvic, right pelvic and none over the course of four years to monitor the age of the fish and when it was stocked. When the fish are electro-fished in the fall, the biologist can distinguish year classes of browns. Sometimes the fin will grow back but it will look different or have a bend to it sometimes. Sometimes it’s very difficult to see the clip after 3 or 4 years of growth on a fish so a new method of marking was tested out. The marks or tattoo is an elastomer gel that is injected under the skin and stays with the fish for a long time. There are many color and marking locations on the fish unlike the fin clip. The fish are sedated and a very small needle is inserted under the clear skin tissue behind the eye. The gel hardens to a rubbery material that can be seen very easily in the years to come. Another reason we marked these fish differently was that they were raised from egg at the Maramec hatchery and are a different strain of brown trout. We stocked 2800 (12 inch) browns from Maramec(red tattoo)and another 2900 (12 inch) browns from Shepherd of the Hills hatchery(Adipose clip). This fall, during our sample of the river, we can compare how the two strains survived in the river.  

 For future reference:
2009 & before- no clip
2010-Adipose
2011-right pelvic
2012-left pelvic
2013-no clip
2014-adipose(SOH), right eye mark(Maramec)
So the Mystery is solved!!!!
Soft Hackles – the Go to Fly!

Most fly fishermen will tell you that nothing is more exciting than seeing a rise, targeting the fish and then catching it with a dry fly. I would agree with that! But then I would bet that the majority of those rises the trout are not feeding on adult dry flies but on those aquatic insects stuck in the film layer or emerging just below the surface. If you're ever observed the hatching of an aquatic insect (mayfly, caddis, or midge) they don't hang around on the surface very long, Many times they're up and out of there. It seems when they come back to lay their eggs they hang out on the surface a little longer. So what's my point? When the hatch starts I believe the majority of the rises are for those insects stuck in the film layer or emerging. So my go to fly is usually the soft hackle.

The soft hackle fly (wet fly or flymph) comes in all shapes and sizes, imitating mayfly, caddis, and midge emergers and cripples. And they are a blast to fish with strikes that sometimes rip the rod out of your hands to subtle strikes that need the most savvy of hook sets. In my many years of teaching fly fishing on the water I have found that beginners have difficulty fishing with soft hackles. They feel the strike and in their excitement, lose the trout with their hook set. Most beginners have the tendency to set the hook too fast and too hard usually ripping the hook out of the trout's soft mouth.

There are several techniques that I use when fishing soft hackles that bring me much success. First, I use the standard wet fly swing. If I am fishing to a rise I try to cast the fly line so that the end of the swing will drift near or in front of the rise. With that said, I watch about 9 feet behind my WF fly line (my leader being about 9 feet) for any type of rise or burble in the water. Knowing that my soft hackle isn't very deep the trout has to break the water surface to get to my fly. I take small strips of my fly line to make sure my line is taut. Depending on how the trout strikes the soft hackle, i.e. was it a hard strike or light subtle strike, I will set the hook two different ways.

First, if the trout strikes hard, I will literally release my fly line from my left hand. I saw this technique in a video by Gary Borger (famous fly fisher guy). When the trout hits the fly hard it usually will turn away and head back down in a hurry. With the trout going away from you and you pulling the fly line hard in the opposite direction will, most times, pull the hook from the trout's mouth. So if you release the fly line, the line going through the guides will be sufficient enough to set the hook as the trout heads away from you. Give yourself a second or two, grab your fly line and raise your rod tip. Fish on! Try it – it works.

Now if the hit is subtle – “soft hit” , i.e. you see the rise 9 feet from your fly line and you “think” the trout is on your fly (a very soft tug), I wait another second and then slowly lift my rod straight up. If the trout hasn't hit my fly yet usually it will on the lift, thinking that this insect is rising to hatch. Mr trout doesn't want that soft hackle fly to get away. A slow lift will help your hook ups during those subtle hits tremendously. Or as printed in a recent fly fishing article I read by Dave Hughes, “When the first cast entered an area where I'd seen trout working. I felt a soft tug, waited a moment, then felt the solid pull that indicated a trout had turned on the fly, taken it solidly, hooked itself. You've felt that tug, managed to restrain yourself, waited until the fish was on.”

When fishing soft hackles also remember to do you best to imitate the hatching insects and that size matters. I usually find going smaller in size always is better than larger. So try these two “hook up” techniques next time the rises start and I am sure you will increase your catch using soft hackles. They are fun to fish and easy to tie. Hey, if you think the trout are hitting the dry flies but they ignore your offers and let them just drift by, then hit them with a soft hackle! As Dave Hughes says in his article, “ If you’re not careful you can mistake all the violence for the killings of caddisflies (mayflies and midges) afloat on the water. Most of the murder takes place subsurface.”
The FATC introduces their initial FATC Fly Fishing Instructors.  Your Instructor cadre has been hand selected for their experience not only in fly fishing but also in the fellowship that the FATC provides.  The Instructors have been with the FATC for several years and have fished the majority of places that the FATC fish here in Missouri and outside the state.  They have been chartered to teach and escort our new "students" that have completed the FATC fly fishing course on the river for their first time experience.  Each Instructor has also completed a three hour fly fishing instructor course.  Congratulations to our initial FATC Instructor cadre.  As the FATC grow we will build our Instructor team so as to make the experience of fly fishing enjoyable to all.
The FATC Fly Fishing Instructor Cadre
Kenny Klimes
The lead of the FATC. Started the FATC in 2007, teaches the fly fishing class.  Has fly fished for over 24 years in the western states, Alaska, Canada to include FATC trips to San Juan river New Mexico, Yellowstone, Colorado, ROLF, Lake Taneycomo, and most all rivers in Missouri.
John "Dr. Montauk" Walker
Joined the FATC in 2007 in the very first class. Has fished all the FATC trips to include Lake Taneycomo, ROLF, San Juan river - New Mexico, Yellowstone, and all the Missouri parks and rivers. John personally set up two Yellowstone trips for the FATC.
Larry "Bam-Bam" Farrar
Joined the FATC in the very first class in 2007. Has fished all the rivers/parks in Missouri to include trips to Lake Taneycomo, Current river, and Meramec river. An expert fly tier and originator of the WWF.
Dave "Tenkara Flash" Beerbower
Has been a FATC member since 2009 and now that he is retired fishes more than most. His FATC trips include Lake Taneycomo, Yellowstone, and a side trip to New Zealand. He has also fished all the parks and rivers in Missouri.
Mike Bisaga
Mike joined the FATC in 2011 and his FATC trips include Lake Taneycomo and ROLF. He is the FATC Lead of our Stream Team. He still holds the record for most fish caught first time on the water. He has fished all the parks/rivers in Missouri that the FATC fish.
The Smokejumper - a New Fly To Try!!   Recently I found a fly that looked very interesting for fishing during those times when the trout are taking flies in the film layer.  I wanted something small especially when those midges (winter) are trying to hatch but are stuck in the film layer.  I discovered this fly through the web site "Catch and the Hatch" and thought I would give it a try.  It seemed easy to tie and that was good but the look of the fly intrigued me more.  It's a type of fly that sits just below the surface and looks like a tasty morsel and easy prey for the trout.  If you look on our "Fly Tying" page you will find a video on how to tie the Smokejumper fly.  Here is how to fish it which is very interesting and I think you should follow since I had trouble fishing it when I first took it out on the water.  This article is from the web site "Catch and the Hatch" and they use this fly plenty.

Tips on Using The Smokejumper   It Needs Proper Support

This fly is delicate and sinks easily.  It's tied with CDC so all it takes is a few false casts to dry it out, but after catching a fish (which happens often) you'll need to dry it out.  

Gink or floatant doesn't work on CDC and so you're left with using Frog's Fanny or some other CDC powder drying product.  

Make sure you have frog's fanny or something that will dry out your CDC flies with this fly or you're going to struggle to keep it floating.  

The other tool I'd highly recommend is a NZ Strike Indicator.  This is the best indicator to use for dry fly fishing because of how delicate it is.  If you're going to fish the smokejumper as an emerger, this is the best to use as you'll often throw this fly in slack water vs fast riffles.  A thing-a-ma-bobber will spook every fish in the hole, but the NZ strike indicator is so soft and unobtrusive, it often gets eaten as well!   It's a great indicator for this application and is highly recommended.

Other Tips for Fishing the Smokejumper

In addition to having the right tools to support the smokejumper, make sure you fish this fly to fish that are slowly rising in the ends of pools, runs and back eddies.  As a midge emerges, it ends up in this slack water where it attempts to break the water surface and fly away.  As this happens the trout key in on this and eat them.  The smokejumper imitates this exact scenario and it's why it's so deadly successful.  

Fish it in slack or slow water with 5x to 7x line.  You won't get away with much less unless the fish are ignorant.  This is a delicate fly to fish but the payouts can be huge. 

Make sure you don't cast over the fish and "line" the fish, but instead approach him at a 45' angle downstream or upstream and drift it to the fish where the trout does not see your line.  Thats where you'll find the best success. 
NEW SPONSOR - Compass 360 Gear will be allowing us to purchase waders, wading boots, rain gear and more for up to 40% off.  Contact Kenny Klimes (kennyklimes@aol.com) for details - For FATC members only. www.compass360gear.com
Rock Treads: The latest in aluminum cleats for wading boots.  This unique design gives unbelievable traction and stabilty for vibram bottom wading boots.  Rock Treads gives us an awesome discount of almost 50% off of retail.  Must use member discount code.  www.rocktreads.com
Dry Case products keep everything dry.  Their unique dry case for cell phones allows you to take pictures and calls without ever taking your phone out of the case - keeping your cell phone bone dry when on the river.  25% discount on most products. Must us member discount code. www.drycase.com
Ecclesiastes 4:12
Some of us have been fishing throughout the winter and others of us have not. Either way it may be time to tune up your gear for the upcoming spring and summer season.  Here are some Spring tips from our friends at Cutthroat Leaders:


Spring to do list...
- Check lines for cracks, tears, broken loops, etc
- clean fly lines 
- change leaders on all lines. Attach new tippet to new leaders. 
- organize fly boxes. throw away bad flies, re-sharpen good ones you  
  want to keep.
- organize your vest/pack. Why wait until the night of your first trip. 
- do you need any new tools / accessories. Maybe a new Strike indicator system?
- check waders, any tears from last year? Finish any patch work req'd.